A Guide to Installing Glass Mosaic Tile

This guide covers installation of how to put in glass mosaic tiles.

This Guide to Installing glass mosaics is appropriate for fountain and spa, shower wall, kitchen backsplash and swimming pool applications.

A Note about this Installation Guide:

The grouting guidelines and general installation is relative to nearly all applications.

The subsequent all-purpose installation and grouting guidelines pertain to most applications. The technical service departments of main setting product companies should be investigated concerning exact installation inquiries.

Assessment:

In terms of deciding the suitability of the material, the end user is responsible for this. Installation comprises acceptance of tile arrangement.

The nature of glass mosaic tile and glass mosaic tile design is custom and the levels of creative distinction includes size, tone, color and shade surrounded by every tile sheet; there are some tiles that may have minor chips along the edging of the glass mosaic tiles.
Inspect every carton tile, while opening, to validate the regularity of the shading. Indiscriminately choose five tile sheets from dissimilar cartons, which will set up color control throughout the installation. Blend sheets from different cartons to ensure random placement during installation, prior to installing tile. During sheet installation, test them with control samples before they are placed in the setting product; this makes sure the quality and shade variations are acceptable.

Installation:

Some basic procedures for installing glass mosaic tile differ from installing stone tile, ceramic tile, or the like. Following these actions will avert straightforward mishaps from happening, possibly resulting in the failure of the installation.

How to cut Glass Mosaic Tile

To cut Glass Mosaic Tile, glass tiles that are in a small format cut best with specialty glass mosaic tile scissors and bigger sizes [2x2] are cut best with a wet saw. When using a diamond cut-off or carbide blade, use a high-quality wet saw.

  1. Glass mosaic tiles must be cut in a tremendously slow manner to prevent rough edges.
  2. To continue to cut through a tile, turn the tile upside down while cutting halfway , while flipping the tile over while you continue to slice through it. This reduces the chipping of the face of the glass mosaic tile and of both color backs.
  3. After cutting, the cut edges should be sanded or stoned smooth.
To cut Glass Mosaic Tile, glass tiles that are in a small format cut best with specialty glass mosaic tile scissors

To cut Glass Mosaic Tile, glass tiles that are in a small format cut best with specialty glass mosaic tile scissors

Substrate:

The glass mosaic tile should be installed over the proper substrate, for an optimum result. To ensure a superior installation, this is one of the most important factors.

Choosing the correct backing is imperative to installing your glass mosaic tile. The different backing types are listed below:

  • Drywall
  • Concrete
  • Green Board
  • Cement Board

It is imperative that the tiling surface is sound, clean and free of oils and dirt, including sealers and curing compounds. Substrate, if in water, should be waterproof. Substrate should also not have any cracks.

Glass mosaic tiles are products that are reflective. Since glass is a reflective product, it’s prone to scratching. If there are any inconsistencies in the substrate, they will show up following the installation of the tile.

Glass mosaic tile should not be installed on the following:

  • Asbestos boards
  • Plywood
  • Press Wood
  • Masonite
  • Chipboard
  • Particleboard
Ideal Setting Materials:

A thin-set mortar or setting product is recommended for color consistency with the samples.

Glass mosaic tiles are durable, shouldn’t be subjected to excessive thermal or mechanical shock and they are only as good as they are installed. Installation products should only be used, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Wipe back of the tile and substrate clean with a clean damp sponge prior to installation. This is essential to attain 100% mortar coverage.

Grouting:

Grouting may be completed after the glass mosaic tile is set – approximately 24 hours following installation. During the grout process, grout becomes collected as glass mosaic tiles have varying degrees of exterior texture. There will always be grout remaining in the surfaces creates or pinholes; however through cleaning after grouting removes most of it. After installation, the amount of grout evident depends largely on the color contrast between tile color and grout color. It also depends on the viewing distance and how thorough the tiles were cleaned during grouting.

Prior to grouting, an area should be tested to ensure the surface doesn’t scratch throughout grouting. Grout joints should be free of pits, voids, and packed-free. Excess grout should be cleaned from the exterior as the project advances before grout hardens and while it’s fresh.

Apply grout with a rubber float, sanded or un-sanded, making sure grout joints are completely full and free of pits and voids. The surface should be cleaned with a damp, clean sponge.

Grout should be set firm or until the grout in the joints set firm or haze forms on the tile. Final cleaning of grout haze and tile polishing is done within 24 hours of grouting, and with a dry, clean cheesecloth. To polish off remaining grout residue and haze, use a clean, soft, dry cloth.

Protection:

Allow the grout to cure for a minimum of seven days prior to steam cleaning or aggressive use. There shouldn’t be any traffic on grout joints or fresh tile. Precautions should be taken by the contractor to protect the finished work from damage by other trades.

Maintenance & Cleaning:

Standard cleaning of glass mosaic tiles can be with water at room temperature or cleaner and a soft lint-free cloth. For a more thorough cleaning and to remove stubborn dirt and stains, use any of the many tile and grout cleaners available through home centers or tile dealers.

What is the crystal glass tile?

Crystal mosaic tiles, which can be see through so it gets the name as “crystal”, but with the color paints on the back of the mosaic tiles makes thousands of colors are possible.

White Crystal Glass Mosaic Tile Design Kitchen Bathroom Backsplash Wall Floor Stickers

White Crystal Glass Mosaic Tile Design Kitchen Bathroom Backsplash Wall Floor Stickers

  • Collection: Glass Mosaic Tiles
  • Material: Glass
  • Color: White, mix light blue
  • Surface Finish: Glossy, easy for cleaning.
  • Shape: Square
  • Sheet Size: 300mmx300mm
  • Chip Size: 23mmx23mm
  • Thickness: 4mm

Glass mosaic tiles are impervious to the elements, thus it is great for both interior and exterior use so moisture is not an issue. Glass mosaic tiles are great on floors and walls and have been most popular in bathrooms, spas, kitchen backsplash, wall facades and pools as well as a variety of other applications.

Black Crystal Glass Mosaic Tiles Kitchen Backsplash Design Bathroom Wall Floor Shower

Black Crystal Glass Mosaic Tiles Kitchen Backsplash Design Bathroom Wall Floor Shower

Crystal mosaic tiles are the most widespread mosaic tiles in common use and are used in great numbers by builders and tilers for common tasks such as shower bases and swimming pool edging, but these useful mini mosaic tiles can readily be adapted for artistic craft work. They are usually supplied on a backing sheet of light fabric mesh, from which they are easily detached with warm water.

Mosaic Tile Art Pattern Frosted Crystal Glass Backsplash Bathroom Interior Wall Tiles Floor

Mosaic Tile Art Pattern Frosted Crystal Glass Backsplash Bathroom Interior Wall Tiles Floor

Glass mosaic tile has a zero water absorption rate, and this tile exceeds ANSI standards for water absorption for mosaic tile. It is strong, durable, contamination free, and only the best quality tiles are selected as our tiles.

Crystal mosaic tiles are extremely durable and almost totally stain resistant.

Crystal mosaic tile are often used for special effects, wherever light plays an important role, similar to stained glass mosaic tiles.

Late Antique and Medieval Mosaics in Italy

Italy has the richest concentration of Late Antique and medieval mosaics in the world. Although the technique is especially associated with Byzantine art, and many Italian mosaics were probably made by imported Greek-speaking artists and craftsmen, the numbers of significant mosaics remaining in the core Byzantine territories are surprisingly few. This is especially true for the centuries before the Byzantine Iconoclasm of the 8th century.

Early Roman mosaics belonged to the floor, except in Nero’s Domus Aurea, there is little evidence of ambitious wall mosaics before the Christian period, even at Pompeii and surrounding sites, where their chances of survival were better than elsewhere. The famous Alexander Mosaic (c. 100) from Pompeii, arguably the finest pre-Christian mosaic to survive, was a floor, and the main use of vertical mosaics there is in places unsuitable for frescos, such as fountains, baths and garden architecture including the very popular nymphaeum.

Sumptuous floor mosaics found by archaeology in villas continue into the Late Antique period, including those at the Villa Romana del Casale at Piazza Armerina and the Gladiator Mosaic, both of about the 320s. In contrast, the floors of Early Christian churches contained very little figurative art, no doubt largely because it was considered inappropriate to walk on sacred images. The church floors are mostly geometrical, with small images in compartments of animals and the like, whereas the most important villa floors may contain huge scenes with many figures. The major surviving exception is the floor of the Cathedral at Aquileia, which is the earliest large area of Christian mosaic in Italy, dating to 314-18. This has large images of Christian symbols such as are seen in the Catacombs of Rome, including the Good Shepherd and Jonah and the whale, but no direct depictions of Christ. The Tomb of the Julii, under and pre-dating St Peter’s, Rome also has symbolic images, including a famous one of Christ as the sun god in his chariot. This subject also has the gold background not usually seen until the end of the 4th century.

What is the tile?

A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, metal, or even glass, generally used for covering roofs, floors, walls, showers, or other objects such as tabletops. Alternatively, tile can sometimes refer to similar units made from lightweight materials such as perlite, wood, and mineral wool, typically used for wall and ceiling applications. In another sense, a tile is a construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of fired clay.

Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made of ceramic, typically glazed for internal uses and unglazed for roofing, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, cork, concrete and other composite materials, and stone. Tiling stone is typically marble, onyx, granite or slate. Thinner tiles can be used on walls than on floors, which require more durable surfaces that will resist impacts.

Ravenna Mosaic Art

In the 5th-century Ravenna, the capital of the Western Roman Empire, became the center of late Roman mosaic art. The Mausoleum of Galla Placidia was decorated with mosaics of high artistic quality in 425-430. The vaults of the small, cross-shaped structure are clad with mosaics on blue background. The central motif above the crossing is a golden cross in the middle of the stary sky. Another great building established by Galla Placidia was the church of San Giovanni Evangelista. She erected it in fulfillment of a vow that she made having escaped from a deadly storm in 425 on the sea voyage from Constantinople to Ravenna. The mosaics depicted the storm, portraits of members of the western and eastern imperial family and the bishop of Ravenna, Peter Chrysologus. They are known only from Renaissance sources because almost all were destroyed in 1747.

Ostrogoths kept alive the tradition in the 6th century, as the mosaics of the Arian Baptistry, Baptistry of Neon, Archbishop’s Chapel, and the earlier phase mosaics in the Basilica of San Vitale and Basilica of Sant’Apollinare Nuovo testify.

After 539 Ravenna was reconquered by the Romans in the form of the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantine Empire) and became the seat of the Exarchate of Ravenna. The greatest development of Christian mosaics unfolded in the second half of the 6th century. Outstanding examples of Byzantine mosaic art are the later phase mosaics in the Basilica of San Vitale and Basilica of Sant’Apollinare Nuovo. The mosaic depicting Emperor Saint Justinian I and Empress Theodora in the Basilica of San Vitale were executed shortly after the Byzantine conquest. The mosaics of the Basilica of Sant’Apollinare in Classe were made around 549. The anti-Arian theme is obvious in the apse mosaic of San Michele in Affricisco, executed in 545-547.

The last example of Byzantine mosaics in Ravenna was commissioned by bishop Reparatus between 673-79 in the Basilica of Sant’Apollinare in Classe. The mosaic panel in the apse showing the bishop with Emperor Constantine IV is obviously an imitation of the Justinian panel in San Vitale.

Christian Mosaic Early Christian Art

With the building of Christian basilicas in the late 4th century, wall and ceiling mosaics were adopted for Christian uses. The earliest examples of Christian basilicas have not survived, but the mosaics of Santa Constanza and Santa Pudenziana, both from the 4th century, still exist. The winemaking putti in the ambulatory of Santa Constanza still follow the classical tradition in that they represent the feast of Bacchus, which symbolizes transformation or change, and are thus appropriate for a mausoleum, the original function of this building. In another great Constantinian basilica, the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem the original mosaic floor with typical Roman geometric motifs is partially preserved. The so-called Tomb of the Julii, near the crypt beneath St Peter’s Basilica, is a 4th-century vaulted tomb with wall and ceiling mosaics that are given Christian interpretations. The former Tomb of Galerius in Thessaloniki, converted into a Christian church during the course of the 4th century, was embellished with very high artistic quality mosaics. Only fragments survive of the original decoration, especially a band depicting saints with hands raised in prayer, in front of complex architectural fantasies.

In the following century Ravenna, the capital of the Western Roman Empire, became the center of late Roman mosaic art (see details in Ravenna section). Milan also served as the capital of the western empire in the 4th century. In the St Aquilinus Chapel of the Basilica of San Lorenzo, mosaics executed in the late 4th and early 5th centuries depict Christ with the Apostles and the Abduction of Elijah; these mosaics are outstanding for their bright colors, naturalism and adherence to the classical canons of order and proportion. The surviving apse mosaic of the Basilica of Sant’Ambrogio, which shows Christ enthroned between Saint Gervasius and Saint Protasius and angels before a golden background date back to the 5th and to the 8th century, although it was restored many times later. The baptistery of the basilica, which was demolished in the 15th century, had a vault covered with gold-leaf tesserae, large quantities of which were found when the site was excavated. In the small shrine of San Vittore in cieldoro, now a chapel of Sant Ambrogio, every surface is covered with mosaics from the second half of the 5th century. Saint Victor is depicted in the center of the golden dome, while figures of saints are shown on the walls before a blue background. The low spandrels give space for the symbols of the four Evangelists.

Albingaunum was the main Roman port of Liguria. The octagonal baptistery of the town was decorated in the 5th century with high quality blue and white mosaics representing the Apostles. The surviving remains are somewhat fragmented.
A mosaic pavement depicting humans, animals and plants from the original 4th-century cathedral of Aquileia has survived in the later medieval church. This mosaic adopts pagan motifs such as the Nilotic scene, but behind the traditional naturalistic content is Christian symbolism such as the ichthys. The 6th-century early Christian basilicas of Sant’ Eufemia it:Basilica di Sant’Eufemia (Grado) and Santa Maria delle Grazie in Grado also have mosaic floors.

Greek and Roman Mosaic

Bronze age pebble mosaics have been found at Tiryns and mosaics of the 4th century BC are found in the Macedonian palace-city of Aegean, and the 4th-century BC mosaic of The Beauty of Durres discovered in Durres, Albania in 1916, is an early figural example; the Greek figural style was mostly formed in the 3rd century BC. Mythological subjects, or scenes of hunting or other pursuits of the wealthy, were popular as the centerpieces of a larger geometric design, with strongly emphasized borders. Pliny the elder mentions the artist Solos of Pergamum by name, describing his mosaics of the food left on a floor after a feast and of a group of doves drinking from a bowl. Both of these themes were widely copied.

Porcelain Pool Tile Mosaic Pebble Green Bathroom Floor Sticker Wall Border Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Porcelain Pool Tile Mosaic Pebble Green Bathroom Floor Sticker Wall Border Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Greek figural mosaics could have been copied or adapted paintings, a far more prestigious art form, and the style was enthusiastically adopted by the Romans so that large floor mosaics enriched the floors of Hellenistic villas, and Roman dwellings from Britain to Dura-Europe. Most recorded names of Roman mosaic workers are Greek, suggesting they dominated high quality work across the empire; no doubt most ordinary craftsmen were slaves. Splendid mosaic floors are found in Roman villas across North Africa, in places such as Carthage, and can still be seen in the extensive collection in Bardot Museum in Tunis, Tunisia.

mosaic tile pattern design frosted crystal glass backsplash bathroom mirror wall stickers

mosaic tile pattern design frosted crystal glass backsplash bathroom mirror wall stickers

There were two main techniques in Greco-Roman mosaic: opus vermiculatum used tiny tesserae, typically cubes of 4 millimeters or less, and was produced in workshops in relatively small panels which were transported to the site glued to some temporary support. The tiny tesserae allowed very fine detail, and an approach to the illusionism of painting. Often small panels called emblematic were inserted into walls or as the highlights of larger floor mosaics in coarser work. The normal technique was opus tessellate, using larger tesserae, which was laid on site. There was a distinct native Italian style using black on a white background, which was no doubt cheaper than fully colored work.

mosaic tile made by hand used tiny tesserae allowed very fine detail, and an approach to the illusionism of painting

mosaic tile made by hand used tiny tesserae allowed very fine detail, and an approach to the illusionism of painting

In Rome, Nero and his architects used mosaics to cover some surfaces of walls and ceilings in the Domus Aurea, built 64 AD, and wall mosaics are also found at Pompeii and neighbouring sites. However it seems that it was not until the Christian era that figural wall mosaics became a major form of artistic expression. The Roman church of Santa Costanza, which served as a mausoleum for one or more of the Imperial family, has both religious mosaic and decorative secular ceiling mosaics on a round vault, which probably represent the style of contemporary palace decoration.

Mosaic Tile Art Pattern Glazed Crystal Glass Backsplash Kitchen Design Bathroom Wall Tiles

Mosaic Tile Art Pattern Glazed Crystal Glass Backsplash Kitchen Design Bathroom Wall Tiles

The mosaics of the Villa Romana del Casale near Piazza Armerina in Sicily are the largest collection of late Roman mosaics in situ in the world, and are protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The large villa rustica, which was probably owned by Emperor Maximian, was built largely in the early 4th century. The mosaics were covered and protected for 700 years by a landslide that occurred in the 12th century. The most important pieces are the Circus Scene, the 64 m long Great Hunting Scene, the Little Hunt, the Labours of Hercules and the famous Bikini Girls, showing women exercising in modern-looking bikinis. The peristyle, the imperial apartments and the thermae were also decorated with ornamental and mythological mosaics. Other important examples of Roman mosaic art in Sicily were unearthed on the Piazza Vittoria in Palermo where two houses were discovered. The most important scenes there depicted Orpheus, Alexander the Great’s Hunt and the Four Seasons.

crystal glass mosaic tile backsplash shower wall stickers

crystal glass mosaic tile backsplash shower wall stickers

In 1913, Zliten mosaic, a Roman mosaic, famous for its many scenes from gladiatorial contests, hunting and everyday life was discovered in the Libyan town of Zliten. In 2000 archaeologists working in Leptis Magna, Libya uncovered a 30 ft length of five colorful mosaics created during the 1st or 2nd century AD. The mosaics show a warrior in combat with a deer, four young men wrestling a wild bull to the ground, and a gladiator resting in a state of fatigue, staring at his slain opponent. The mosaics decorated the walls of a cold plunge pool in a bath house within a Roman villa. The gladiator mosaic is noted by scholars as one of the finest examples of mosaic art ever seen.

What is the Mosaic?

Mosaic is the art of creating images with an assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials. It is a technique of decorative art or interior decoration. Most mosaics are made of small, flat, roughly square, pieces of stone or glass of different colors, known as tesserae; but mosaics, especially floor mosaics, may also be made of small rounded pieces of stone, and called “pebble mosaics”.

The earliest known examples of mosaics made of different materials were found at a temple building in Abra, Mesopotamia, and are dated to the second half of 3rd millennium BC. They consist of pieces of colored stones, shells and ivory. Excavations at Susa and Chogha Zanbil show evidence of the first glazed tiles, dating from around 1500 BC.[1] However, mosaic patterns were not used until the times of Sassanid Empire and Roman influence.

How to Install a Tile Backsplash

A step-by-step guide to transforming a blank space into a ceramic focal point.

Step 1: Prepare the Wall

  • Remove all the switch plates and outlet covers from the backsplash.
  • Hand-sand the wall with 80-grit sandpaper to roughen the painted surface, then wipe off the dust with a damp rag.
  • Measure and mark the exact center of the room’s visual focal point at the counter level (here, it’s the range).
  • Using a sharp pencil and a 2-foot level, draw a perfectly plumb starting line through the center mark.
Prepare the Wall

Installing Tile Backsplash – Prepare the Wall

Step 2: Apply Mastic

  • Scoop some tile mastic or thin-set out of the bucket with the edge of the V-notched trowel.
  • Holding the trowel at a slight angle to its long edge, use a sweeping motion to spread the mastic across the wall, covering only an area large enough for eight tiles.
  • Look for any bare spots and fill them in with mastic.
Apply Mastic

Install Tile Backsplash – Apply Mastic

Step 3: Set the Field Tile

  • Start setting the field tiles at the bottom of the vertical center line. Place the edge of the first tile right on the line and make sure the base of the tile is parallel with the edge of the counter (or existing 4-inch backsplash), leaving just enough room for a bead of caulk.
  • Firmly press the tile into the mastic. Then continue setting tiles, working out in both directions from the center line. Continue with the next rows up until you reach the row against the cabinets or one requiring decorative tiles.
Set the Field Tile

Install Tile Backsplash – Set the Field Tile

Step 4: Cut Tiles to Fit

  • When you get to a cabinet or pattern edge that requires you to trim a tile with a single straight cut, place a full tile in the space and mark it.
  • Using a score-and-snap tile cutter, score the tile once (strongly) with the cutting wheel.
  • Carefully snap the tile along the score line.
Cut Tiles to Fit

Install Tile Backsplash – Cut Tiles to Fit

Step 5: Set the Decorative Tiles

  • With a geometric mural like the one shown here, it’s important to dry-fit all the tiles to be sure you have all the pieces cut to the right size.
  • Apply mastic to the mural area on the wall and set the tile into the mystic, using your original plumb line to center the design.
  • If appropriate, establish the outline of the mural with listello border tiles, pressing them into the mastic along the edges of the design.
Set the Decorative Tiles

Install Tile Backsplash – Set the Decorative Tiles

Step 6: Notch Tiles with a Wet Saw

  • Mark any tiles that need to be notched around a cabinet corner, switch box, or electrical receptacle.
  • Lay the tile on the sliding table of a rented motorized wet saw (easier for shaped cuts) and push it forward into the diamond-abrasive blade to cut one side. Pull back the table, rotate the tile, and make the second cut.
  • Use tile nippers to remove any material in the notch.
  • Finish tiling the backsplash. On inside corners, butt the edges of the tiles against the tiles on the adjoining wall, living room for caulk. Install bullnose tile at open ends of the backsplash and at the top if there are no upper cabinets
Notch Tiles with a Wet Saw

Install Tile Backsplash – Notch Tiles with a Wet Saw

Step 7: Fill the Tile Joints with Grout

  • Allow mastic to dry overnight.
  • The next day, mix a batch of unsanded tile grout (sanded if grout lines are wider than 1⁄8 inch) in a clean bucket, following the directions on the carton.
  • Scoop some grout out of the bucket with a rubber grout float and smear it across the surface of the tile diagonally to the grout lines.
  • Pack the grout deep into the joints, but don’t get any into the seam between the tiles and the countertop or existing 4-inch backsplash.
Fill the Tile Joints with Grout

Install Tile Backsplash – Fill the Tile Joints with Grout

Step 8: Clean and Caulk

  • After grouting the entire backsplash, clean the surface with a soft sponge and clear water, rinsing the sponge often. Wipe diagonally to the grout lines so as not to pull any grout from the joints.
  • Wait 30 to 45 minutes for the grout to set and for a hazy film to appear on the tiles, then buff off the haze with a clean, dry cloth until the tiles shine.
  • Squeeze a thin bead of tub-and-tile caulk, the same color as the grout, into the joint at the very bottom of the backsplash, in the corners, and between the tiles and the cabinets. Smooth with a wet finger.
Clean and Caulk

Install Tile Backsplash – Clean and Caulk

Showcase your new backsplash

Make an Affordable and Stylish Upgrade to Your Kitchen

One of the top recommendations for adding value to your house is a kitchen upgrade, but you don’t have to spend a lot of time or money on it. If you want to refresh your kitchen but can’t afford a full-scale remodel, a smart place to start is with tiling a backsplash, which only takes a weekend and can cost as little as $5 per square foot. You can switch out a backsplash without moving cabinetry or appliances, and the sky’s the limit in terms of material choices, colors, and patterns. If your kitchen currently only has bare walls, you’ll also delight in the easy clean-up a smart backsplash provides. We’ve put together 10 design and installation tips for installing a backsplash, along with 10 glass and ceramic tile choices.

Natural White Mother of Pearl Tile Sheets Subway Shell Mosaic Kitchen Backsplash Tiles

Natural White Mother of Pearl Tile Sheets Subway Shell Mosaic Kitchen Backsplash Tiles

  • Collection: Light Weight Mother of Pearl Tile.
  • Material: Shell
  • Color: Natural White, majority chips are white, with small percentage of natural yellow and minimun natural grey; overall is white.
  • Surface Finish: Glossy, easy for cleaning.
  • Shape: Subway
  • Sheet Size: 11.9×11.7 In. (302x297mm)
  • Chip Size: 3/5×1 In. (15x25mm)
  • Thickness: 2mm

The options for backsplash materials and tile types are endless. Check out the looks we love before updating your kitchen backsplash.

Mother of Pearl Tile for Bathroom Mirrored Wall Backsplash

Mother of Pearl Tile for Bathroom Mirrored Wall Backsplash

Mother of Pearl mosaic tiles are impervious to the elements, thus it is great for both interior and exterior use so moisture is not an issue. Mother of Pearl mosaic tiles are great on floors and walls and have been most popular in bathrooms, spas, kitchen backsplash, wall facades and pools as well as a variety of other applications.

Mother of Pearl Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Mother of Pearl Tile Kitchen Backsplash

Mother of pearl tiles are utilized widely by mainstream designers and architects as bathroom wall and floor tiles, kitchen backsplash wall tiles, hotel lobbies and reception areas wall and floor tiles, corporate office reception areas wall tiles. The natural iridescence adds the taste and richness to the design formula.